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Housekeeping Tips

Hate cleaning your house? No one could blame you!  Before hiring a housekeeper or cleaning service, do yourself a favor and start with these items to save you money and keep your maid happy!

1. Clear the clutter first. 

Maria Stickney, the Housekeeping Manager at the Radisson Blu Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, likes to clear the clutter out of a room, so she can start with a blank slate. She empties the trash, removes the linens, towels, and anything else left behind. In the bathroom, she clears the towels, bathmats, bottles, and everything on the counters or toilet tank. "This removes the temptation of just wiping around these items or picking them up and immediately placing them back down on a wet surface, which can leave ring marks," she says.  (From Good Housekeeping)

2. If you wouldn't touch it, they won't either.

Yes, housecleaners will scrub away that nasty buildup around the bottom of your toilet seat. But they also have a limit: They won’t pick up your dog’s poop.

Or—and yes, Megan Sentner, manager at Greenapple Cleaning in Ottawa, Ontario, says it’s happened—yours.

“Sometimes there are expectations that we can clean it, but we don’t,” she says. “We don’t expect our team to handle any waste above the usual cleaning of the bathroom or the toilet.” (From Realtor.com)

3. Be Specific.

Unless you’re ordering a top-to-bottom scrubbing every week, your cleaners need direction. Is the bathroom looking a little grungy? Ask them to spend extra time on the shower. Request extra attention to your baseboards. Sic them on your son’s room, now that he’s finally off to college.

“If they don’t leave full instructions, there’s a chance they’ll be disappointed,” Sentner says.

If you’re new to the world of professional housecleaning, you might not know exactly what your home needs most. Most maid services will happily stop by for a consultation so you can learn exactly how dirty you are. (From Realtor.com)

4. Check Insurance.

There are two basic type of housekeepers: independents who work on their own, and those who work for companies. With independent contractors, you might be responsible for issues of work eligibility and withholding taxes, which you won’t be if you hire through a company.

Either way, make sure the cleaner is bonded and insured, for their protection as well as yours. (Bonding will help if the housekeeper damages something in your home; an insured worker can keep you off the hook for liability in on-the-job accidents.).  You can also get added insurance through your local insurance provider. (From Denver Post)

5. Don't ask them to lift heavy objects.

Moving boxes and heavy furniture is definitely in the no category. You don’t want a housekeeper getting hurt. Different housekeepers and cleaning companies have different policies on what they will and won't do. “Moving things over 35 pounds is off-limits to cleaners,” says former housekeeper Karine Nelsen, who now runs Zephyr Clean in Idaho. "There's just too much of a risk for injury."  (From Care.com)